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Bruce Springsteen – History Is Made At Night: Darkness Tour Madison Square Garden, 1978 New York, NY
Madison Square Garden, New York, NY, USA – 21-23 August, 1978
Cliff Breining



In 1973 the band Chicago played a string of dates culminating in two nights at New York’s Madison Square Garden on 14 and 15 June. The support act was Bruce Springsteen, and the tour was, to say the least, not a happy experience for him, as Christopher Sandford relates in Springsteen: Point Blank: “Things soured in Philadelphia…’Kids were throwing rolls of toilet paper,’ says [manager, Mike] Appel. A fan bounced a basket ball off Springsteen’s piano. ‘They’re not paying attention to me,’ was his wild understatement to his manager. Something similar, or worse, happened at Madison Square Garden…Springsteen ran off stage in New York, announced he was quitting, ‘shrieked like a beast’ at Appel and burst into tears. After the recriminations had died down, he vowed he’d never play another ‘shed’ and ‘never as someone’s butt-fuck.’ ‘I told Bruce, okay, no more big venues,’ says Appel.”

However, shows at “big venues” became inevitable as Springsteen’s popularity grew over the next few years. As Robert Santelli writes in Greetings From E Street, “The Darkness Tour saw Springsteen and the E Street Band graduate from clubs and theaters to arenas wherever their popularity was solid enough to sell twelve or fourteen thousand tickets in one night…The push was on to reach as many people as possible with the new album.” “It was a triumphal tour,” writes Dave Marsh in Born To Run: The Bruce Springsteen Story, “selling out even in some places where Bruce had never played before; the best shows came in the biggest halls, too, proving that Springsteen had broken through that final barrier, on his own terms…Certainly, by playing sports arenas so successfully, Springsteen proved that he could have both quality and quantity; in fact, he got a clearer, more powerful sound in Madison Square Garden than many acts have at the Palladium or the Bottom Line.” As Springsteen’s three concerts at the Madison Square Garden clearly demonstrates, he laid the ghost of the Chicago experience to rest. Chris Hunt, in Springsteen: Blinded By The Light, states: “Bruce returns triumphantly to the venue he had last played as support to Chicago in 1973.”

Madison Square Garden, New York, NY, USA – 21 August, 1978

Summertime Blues, Badlands, Spirit In The Night, Darkness On The Edge Of Town, Heartbreak Hotel, Factory, The Promised Land, Prove It All Night, Racing In The Street, Thunder Road, Jungleland, Paradise By The C, The Fever, Sherry Darling, 4th Of July, Asbury Park (Sandy), Sweet Little Sixteen, Not Fade Away/Gloria/She’s The One, Growin’ Up, Backstreets/Sad Eyes, Rosalita (Come Out Tonight), Born To Run, Because The Night, Quarter To Three

The first show gets off to a cracking start with a boisterous rendition of Eddie Cochran’s 1958 classic, Summertime Blues, which had already opened several other shows during August. As usual, Clarence Clemons voices the lines of the song’s authority figures. Springsteen made a habit of starting shows at this time with either Badlands or, as here, with classic numbers from the past. The effect of the opening of a Darkness Tour show is conveyed by second night attendee, Anthony Fischetti, on the The Light In Darkness website: “The best way to describe what you felt when the band walked out onto the boards and ripped into the opening number (whether it was ‘Good Rockin’ Tonight,’ ‘Summertime Blues,’ ‘High School Confidential,’ or ‘Badlands’) is to harken back to the old Maxell tape ads, where a guy puts a Maxell tape into his stereo and the sound that come out of the speakers blows his hair and his scarf back, and sends his drink skidding across the table through the sheer force and power of its volume and energy.” The almost tangible sense of energy is continued with a spirited Badlands, offering its defiant response to the inevitable hardship and mundanity of human existence, which ends amid a level of cheering and applause from the audience that renders redundant Springsteen’s question, “What do you say? We doing OK so far?” Next up is a vibrant Spirit In The Night, enjoyable but, like other versions from the Darkness Tour, somehow less sinuous and earthy than performances from earlier years.

Things take a somber turn with a searingly intense Darkness On The Edge Of Town, but this mood, which one might expect to continue into another Darkness song, is immediately interrupted with a performance of Elvis Presley’s Heartbreak Hotel, with Springsteen attempting a distinctly Presleyan vocal turn. He then creates a rather tenuous link with the next song, informing the audience that, “across the street from that hotel they…they built a factory.” During the atmospheric opening he goes on to tell the now-familiar tale of listening to his father attempting to start one of his “hundred dollar junk cars” so that he could go to work. As Joanne Hoffman Garroway recalls in The Light In Darkness, Springsteen “peppered the show with stories – some funny, some poignant – and made that huge arena seem like his family living room.”

Like Badlands, The Promised Land offers a spirited defiance of life’s vicissitudes. Like much of Darkness On The Edge Of Town, the song discusses the effect of a mundane and dispiriting working life (“I’ve done my best to live the right way/I get up every morning and go to work each day/But your eyes go blind and your blood runs cold/Sometimes I fell So weak I want to explode”). As Vike Savoth argues in the foreword to The Light In Darkness, performances such as this are “riveting” because they “ask us [not] to escape but to confront” the dispiriting nature of “our working lives.” Prove It All Night, of course, gains the then-usual piano and guitar intro, together with an additional guitar part at the end. The intro tended to get longer as the tour progressed, and with the stunning guitar solo. When I bought my first vinyl bootleg, Live In The Promised Land (the classic Winterland show of 15 December 1978), of the many live flourishes that impressed me, the expanded Prove It All Night made the biggest impression. Fischetti sums this up splendidly: “The opening set was heavy on ‘Darkness’ album material, and the songs were augmented, enhanced, and accessorized in a way that doesn’t happen these days. The organ/piano intro to the title track, the extended harmonica/piano intro to ‘Promised Land,’ the now-legendary piano/guitar intro to ‘Prove It All Night,’ the extended piano coda to ‘Racing In The Street,’ the ‘Not Fade Away’/’Mona’/’Gloria’ lead-in to ‘She’s the One,’ along with the instrumental break in the middle of it – these flourishes made the songs even more special, and are not seen much anymore.”

Roy Bittan, whose piano playing enhanced the ’78 shows so beautifully, then brings his considerable skills to bear on a superb Racing In The Street, which Springsteen dedicates to his sister Pam, who was in the audience. Bittan’s gorgeous piano provides the bridge to a vivacious full-band Thunder Road, which is prefaced by the story of encountering a house in the Nevada desert built by a Native American from scavenged remnants and the accompanying sign pointing down an “old road” called Thunder Road, reading, “this is the land of peace, love, justice and no mercy.” Has there ever been a better distillation of what the song is all about than that?

The second set opens with Clarence Clemons’ sax leading a high-spirited rendition of the instrumental Paradise By The C, which is a contender for best live version. This is succeeded by what Hoffman Garroway calls “the slow burn” of The Fever, with its sultry sax solo, before more high jinks with the then-new song, Sherry Darling. As was often the case, Springsteen provides a brief introduction to the phenomenon that was fraternity rock before asking the audience to provide the “party noises” to kick start the song.

4th Of July, Asbury Park (Sandy), with its nostalgic, almost melancholy overtones, is a beautifully executed highlight of the second set and the mood is then immediately lightened by the performance of a second classic ’50s number, Chuck Berry’s Sweet Little Sixteen, another song which Springsteen dedicates to his sister. Next comes a wonderfully vibrant She’s The One, prefaced by Not Fade Away, which begins with the usual animalistic calls, but also including a snippet of Gloria. As with the version played in Atlanta on September 30, we only hear the lyrics, sung over the music of She’s The One. This is followed by a sparkling version of Growin’ Up, which usually featured a funny story rather than poignant kind. Here, Springsteen tells the audience of how he discovered that he was a teenage werewolf (“I started acting strange. I went to school, sat down, ate my arithmetic book. I pissed in my desk.” Unlike other Lycanthropes, however, Springsteen’s transformation additionally involves a gold guitar growing out of his side and the tale culminates in Springsteen speeding down the New Jersey Turnpike in a car driven by a certain bulky saxophonist pursued by various police forces, the army, the navy and the marines – “and all I could hear was the chief of Asbury Park police leaning out the window with a megaphone screaming, “stop that son-of-a-bitch with the gold guitar!’”

The second set continues with an emotionally affecting Backstreets, featuring the spoken “Sad Eyes” interlude, and then the main part of the show ends with a barnstorming Rosalita, which includes the band introductions. Springsteen and the E Street Band begin the encores with a positively hair-raising Born To Run and then treat us to what Hoffman Garroway calls “the sexual power” of a brilliantly played Because The Night. Finally, a wonderful show ends triumphantly with an ebullient performance of Gary US Bonds’ Quarter To Three. According to SoulBoogieAlex, the first night’s show, “can compete with the holy trinity of Winterland, Capitol Theatre or the Agora.”


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Darkness COVER
Annual Bruce Springsteen Gift Guide for 2014 Black Friday and beyond…

by Pete Chianca – Blogness on the Edge of Town

(Updated and edited version of the original post.)

If you’re anything like me, right about now you’re so stuffed with gravy that the thought of heading out for a Black Friday shopping spree is about as appealing as … well, anything other than just continuing to sit here, watching football with your belt undone. But gifts must be got at some point, and if there’s a Springsteen fan on your list, you could do a lot worse than any of the items listed below:

MUSIC

Bruce Springsteen: The Album Collection Vol. 1, 1973-1984, the rather expensive reissue of Springsteen’s first seven albums. There’s no doubt that Bruce Springsteen continues to make relevant music, in addition to having one of the great back catalogs of all time. But that’s not to say his publicity and marketing arm couldn’t stand a good kick in the pants now and again. The Walmart greatest hits debacle of 2009 comes to mind. What really got people riled is the cross section of “some of Bruce’s most loyal fans” (to quote brucespringsteen.net) gathered at Jack’s Music Shop to listen to the new, improved recordings, and who even got to experience a drop-in from the man himself. The lack of women is so blatantly apparent it’s amazing that nobody at Bruce Inc. or Sony felt a need to rectify it. Like a lot of fans whose comments I’ve read on social media, I’ve had my doubts about this release since it was announced — the Springsteen completist in me wants that hefty box on my shelf, but my practical side tells me that there’s no way I’m going to get $99 worth of listening pleasure (or $200 for the vinyl) out of it on my piddly “sound system,” no matter how brilliant the engineering is. Also, I’m saving up for that elusive River boxed set that’s rumored to follow.

BOOKS

Outlaw Pete, Bruce Springsteen and Frank Caruso’s children’s book rode into stores November 4th. The book is based on an eight-minute ballad from Springsteen’s 2009 ‘Working on a Dream’ album about a young bank robber who regrets his criminal ways. The tale and the song was inspired by memories of 1950s children’s book ‘Brave Cowboy Bill’. In Bruce’s own words: “Outlaw Pete is an adult book, illustrated by Frank Caruso, who drew and painted its pages. Caruso does more than illustrate the song. His approach, immaculately detailed, simple when it needs to be, parallels Springsteen’s blend of absurdity and meditation.”

There are other Bruce book options. The trick for any would-be teacher of Springsteen, of course, is finding the right textbook, and Scarecrow Press has a good contender: Bruce Springsteen, American Poet and Prophet by Donald L. Deardorff hits just the right tone, tackling Springsteen’s work in themed chapters rather than shackling itself to a chronological take. It’s definitely academic — “breezy” is not a word I’d associate with Deardorff’s prose — but it’s also thoughtful and trenchant, and would be a perfect introduction to Springsteen’s themes for someone just wading into the canon.

The Light in Darkness, Lawrence Kirsch’s collection of fan stories and amazing photos from the Darkness tour era, which only has a few copies left available in its limited edition.

(Click Here to Save on Shipping: The Light in Darkness)

The Light in Darkness

And we of course recommend our very own Glory Days: Springsteen’s Greatest Albums — granted it’s hard to wrap because it’s an eBook, but you can always get it as a treat for yourself, a steal at only $2.65 on Amazon!

When it comes to Springsteen pedigrees, you don’t get much more, well, pedigree-able: Christopher Phillips is the editor of Backstreets magazine and webmaster of go-to fansite Backstreets.com, and his collaborator Louis P. Masur is an American Studies professor at Rutgers (that’s in Jersey!) and author of Runaway Dream, one of the best of the recent slew of Springsteen books. Talk About A Dream, their collection of interviews with Bruce Springsteen draws from his four-decade career. Most of Talk’s 428 pages contain material unique to the volume, all of it revealing, much of it absolutely essential.

You don’t have to get further than page 30 for evidence: That’s where you’ll find “The Lost Interviews” from 1975, a series of sit-downs with European press that were locked in a vault for years; they were excerpted in Backstreets magazine in the ‘90s but never published in full, until now. It’s a loss that needed to be rectified: Catching Springsteen on the cusp of his first major success, it cements themes and attitudes he would go back to again and again during his career. Using primarily Springsteen’s own words pays big dividends, and not just because fans will be able to hear his Jersey cadences and full-throated laugh in their heads as they go. He’s remarkably open and thoughtful, and you can see him gradually building and shaping the themes and concerns that have marked his career: his responsibility to the audience, the forces that drive his writing — from the psychological to the sociological — and the fact that he takes his job deadly seriously, no matter how much fun it is.

FINE ART

You can’t go wrong with a Springsteen painting. Or maybe you can. But we prefer photographic imagery for our walls, visit RoccosPhototavern.com, featuring some of the best Springsteen concert shots this side of the Mississippi. And be sure to say hello to Rocco for us.

BruceBuds

An on line store featuring hand crafted wristbands, Brucelets, necklaces and key chains made special by adding a date of your choice. Also the new BruceBuds Knitted hats in various colours. And if that is not enough, they also have in stock Brucebuds “Glow in the dark” wristbands as well as the great ESB and Drive all night Car stickers – See more at: BruceBuds.com

Good luck everyone and Happy Shopping!

Limited Edition Bruce Springsteen book, The Light in Darkness, less than 100 copies left.Focusing on Springsteen’s 1978 Darkness on The Edge of Town album and tour with amazing photos and stories.
Free Shipping: November 14-December 24,2014 The perfect gift for the Springsteen fan on your list.*
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*(Guaranteed Delivery for Christmas for North America. Orders must be received no later than December 5.)
The Light in Darkness book is not sold in stores
For the first time we are offering two brand new signed books to be won. Good Luck.

"If you are any kind of a Springsteen fan, you need this book! The first story brought me to tears it was so moving and so well written. I am not a big reader, but I sat there in my den last night with the TV on and must have spent almost 2 hours just reading the stories and looking over the great photos from the early years, and thinking back to my younger days."

Steven Delmar
Edison New Jersey

Click to Enter Here: For You
Born to Run (1975) There’s a particular brand of vanity that exists in certain kinds of young men between the ages of 19 and 27 where it’s vitally important to present a façade that is equal parts masculine, feminine, tough, and sensitive. For instance (and this example is purely hypothetical and not at all autobiographical), this certain kind of young man may drive around alone late on rainy nights — he actually chooses to drive when it rains because it is appropriately evocative for his inner emotional geography — while listening to Clarence Clemons’s sax solo on “Jungleland.” And when he feels himself starting to cry, he will look in the rear view mirror in order to stare at his own tears. He knows he will never tell anyone that he cries alone to the sounds of the Big Man’s titanic blowing, but he guesses that strangers will sense it, and this will make him appear soulful. (Forgive him. He is a little naive and very silly.) It doesn’t matter that the lyrics of “Jungleland” have virtually nothing to do with his life — he’s pretty sure that the only people for whom “kids flash guitars just like switchblades” represents reality are Danny Zuko and Kenickie. But this song is still his avatar, and he’s confident it always will be.

Because this person is a nerd, he will remember that a 25-year-old Bruce Springsteen painstakingly directed Clemons in the studio during the recording of “Jungleland,” telling him when to go up, when to go down, and when to hold. And he will wonder whether Bruce did this while staring at himself in the mirror. PROPERLY RATED.

Darkness on the Edge of Town (1978) This was the first Springsteen record co-produced by his new manager and ex–rock critic Jon Landau, and it sounds like a record designed by a rock critic. The songs are shorter (rock critics hate jamminess), more cynical (rock critics hate sentimentality), and generally weighed down by undercurrents of depression and severe daddy issues (no comment). So, I guess I’m outing myself as a sucker for critic-bait when I say this is my favorite Springsteen album. It’s his best “guitar solo” record (see “Adam Raised a Cain” or any live version of “Prove It All Night”). It’s also the first, best example of Springsteen juxtaposing rousing rock music with miniaturist, miserablist, Middle American storytelling — which is to say, it kicks your ass and crushes your heart. PROPERLY RATED.

The River (1980) This is a double album that feels like two separate albums. The first record takes place during the day — the people in these songs go to work and then drink off the drudgery at the corner tavern. The second record occurs in the middle of the night. (Not to be confused with The Night, the romanticized nocturnal fantasy land of the early records. This night is black, cold, and silent, like that final jump cut on the Sopranos finale.) I listen to the first disc at least three times as much, mostly because I love how it splits the difference between Born to Run and Darkness. This disc contains some of Springsteen’s most exuberant songs (“Two Hearts,” “Out in the Street”) as well as his most direct gut punches (“Independence Day,” the title track). Then you have the second disc, which is so ominous and death-obsessed it manages to out-Darkness Darkness. (This is the side that Sylvester Stallone plays endlessly in Cop Land, because the big lug feels like a stolen car being driven on a pitch-black night.)

Initially greeted by critics as a masterwork and responsible for Springsteen’s first hit, “Hungry Heart,” The River was subsequently overshadowed by the records that surround it in his discography. Casual listeners will always pick up Born to Run or Nebraska first. But The River is the most representative of his entire body of work. UNDERRATED.

Nebraska (1982) I love Nebraska. I love that it contains my favorite Springsteen “hit.”2 I love that it has at least three deep cuts (the title track, “Johnny 99,” and “Used Cars”) that belong in the 98th percentile of Bruce Springsteen deep cuts. I love that it easily has the best cover art of any Springsteen album.3 I love that Bruce recorded it at home and on a four-track recorder, which makes Nebraska his Bee Thousand. I love that Kanye West likened Yeezus to Nebraska, because “Hold My Liquor” is essentially “Highway Patrolman” as sung from Frankie’s point of view. That said, we’re not here to figure out whether Nebraska is great, but whether it’s properly rated. This complicates the issue, because Nebraska is the go-to record for people who don’t like Springsteen because it’s not like Springsteen’s other albums.

Which is fine, except these same people then take the next step and declare Nebraska to be Springsteen’s “best” album, based on the (strange) criterion that an artist’s least characteristic work should somehow be considered superior to his most characteristic. I can’t allow this. (In my view, Born, Darkness, and The River are all better records.) Therefore, I must declare Nebraska to be ever so slightly OVERRATED.

Steven Hyden-January 2014

Limited edition Springsteen book, The Light in Darkness, less than 120 copies left.
Focusing on Springsteen’s Darkness on The Edge of Town 1978 album and tour, including highlights from over 70 shows!
Save on Shipping- January-March 2014
CLICK HERE TO SAVE NOW- The Light in Darkness
*The Light in Darkness book is not sold in stores
The Promise: The Darkness on the Edge of Town Story” is a killer 3 CD/3 DVD package that includes a remastered CD of Springsteen’s 1978 masterwork, two albums of previously unreleased tracks, six hours of studio and concert footage, plus an 80-page facsimile copy of the songwriter’s personal notebooks from the time, filled with handwritten lyrics and more. But maybe the Springsteen fan on your holiday list already has that set, or you’re not ready to spring for the $82.00 retail price.
Or maybe you just want to take your favorite Springsteen fan by surprise with something else. In that case, check out “The Light in Darkness,” a large format paperback book of great photos and concert reminiscences that covers the next chapter in that particularly fertile period of Springsteen history.
As seen in the boxed set’s documentary film about the creation of the “Darkness…” album, it was a prolonged and sometimes painful process as Springsteen wrote and rewrote dozens of songs while in the midst of a lawsuit that placed him in self-imposed studio exile. Once the 70+ songs were whittled down to the 10 that Springsteen felt best served his artistic vision and then released to the world, the sense of release and triumph that he and the E Street Band felt upon hitting the road again resulted in a tour that many fans (this DAME among them) consider as one of the best and most energetic of Springsteen’s entire career.
The band was on fire and, although the dramatic and sometimes angry songs of the “Darkness” album were on the set list, the sense of celebration and exhilaration that had always fueled Springsteen’s concerts was at full power in epic, three-plus hour shows.

“The Light in Darkness” is a great fan-focused souvenir of that Springsteen tour, which ran from May 1978 through January 1979. Publisher Lawrence Kirsch, who’s clearly as much a fan as a business man, solicited stories from the fans in the crowd and then combined their impassioned tales with over 200+ classic photographs from the tour, showing Springsteen and the band in all their intense and sometimes goofy glory, proving it all night, every night.
As Kirsch put it, “The connection and bond made between performer and audience during this tour set the stage for all future albums and tours to come…The book will give readers at least a small perspective of what we experienced in 1978.”
It’s a beautiful book that will bring back fond memories to those who were there, and maybe elicit a little envy from those who missed out.
The book is only available on-line for purchase(Not sold in stores), where you’ll also find a treasure trove of Springsteen material, including a photo gallery that gives a taste of the book’s great shots.

Marianne Meyer, Digital Music Examiner
Examiner.com

Celebrate the 2013 Holiday Season with Bruce Springsteen.
Discover the Limited Edition Bruce Springsteen book, The Light in Darkness. The Light In Darkness is a collector’s edition, not sold in stores. Buy now and save on shipping. Less than 120 copies remain.

Bruce Springsteen ‘For You’ Book Raffle

Win Bruce Springsteen For You Book!
In support of the Montreal General Hospital’s Fall 2013 fundraising campaign, Lawrence Kirsch, publisher of “For You, Original Stories and Photographs by Bruce Springsteen’s Legendary Fans” and “The Light in Darkness,” is holding a raffle with a chance to win a brand new signed copy of “For You,” which has been sold out since December 2008.

GIVING
The generosity of donors, volunteers and auxiliaries has made the MUHC what it is today…these precious funds are used for the benefit of current and future patients at the MGH. This year we are collecting funds to benefit two MGH departments, the Emergency/Trauma, and the Gastroenterology Department.

To help raise funds we are raffling off a brand new signed copy (by the publisher) of For You: Original Stories and Photographs by Bruce Springsteen’s LegendaryFans.

If you missed your chance to purchase a copy of this limited-edition book, or even if you just want a second copy to keep as a collector’s item, now is your opportunity. First edition copies of “For You” often sell for hundreds of dollars on eBay, when you can find a copy.

Each $10 ticket you purchase gives you one chance to win and a $15 ticket gives you three chances to win the book. The contest is open to everyone and tickets can be bought from October 11-21, 2013. Tickets can be purchased at The Light in Darkness and For You Bruce, where the winner will be announced October 25, 2013.

Participants can enter the contest as many times as they wish and all proceeds go to the Montreal General Hospital. The book, autographed by the publisher, will be shipped to the winner free of charge anywhere in the world, so everyone is encouraged to enter.

You can help the fund raising efforts for the 2013 campaign by participating in the raffle for a copy of For You. All monies collected will be donated to the Montreal General Hospital.

The Montreal General Hospital, founded in 1821, enjoys a distinguished world reputation, as well as an impressive history of community service. The Montreal General Hospital, a pioneer hospital in North America, introduced teaching at the bedside and founded the first medical school in Canada — the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University.

The hospital has remained allied as a teaching hospital for the century and a half of the Faculty’s existence. The Montreal General Hospital is dedicated to patient care through diagnosis, treatment, research and teaching.

“Through the years, I’ve read almost every book written about Springsteen. Some are great and many are not. Over time, I’ve even become cynical when I hear about new books. In the last few years, there have been a plethora of coffee table book releases in the Springsteen world. Each one in itself is a gorgeous work of art that will glisten on your polished coffee table. However, chances are you are still missing the ultimate Bruce Springsteen keepsake: For You. When I heard about this book a year ago, I dismissed it thinking I didn’t really need yet another glorified coffee table book. I was wrong, dead wrong. For You takes the reader on a magical, mystical and poignant journey through forty years of Bruce Springsteen’s life. It’s a time machine to the past where tickets were once $7, the E Street Band was a boy’s only club, Steve Van Zandt looked like a member of Jimmy Buffet’s band and most of the members of the E Street Band could have begun their own television show – ‘Stashin.’ I wasn’t impressed with the book, I was bowled over.

Anthony Kuzminski
antimusic.com

“In reading For You, at first it’s hard to believe that one performer could possibly have touched this many people this deeply – lifted them from depression, kept them from suicide, helped them through divorce or the death of a parent, or worse, a child. But story after story reveals just how much Springsteen’s music and his almost superhuman presence on the concert stage have penetrated people’s lives and, in as much as it is possible for music to do so, made them whole.

In fact, there’s a running theme of these reminiscences, one that is sure to warm any Bruce fan’s heart: that you are not crazy. Not crazy for seeing dozens or even hundreds of concerts; not crazy for feeling that Springsteen’s songs and lyrics have actually helped carry you through some of life’s toughest moments; not crazy to think that this man whom you’ve never met has and continues to fill some kind of void in your life.”

Peter Chianca
Excerpt from Blogness on the Edge of Town

Please help spread the news on your Facebook page and Twitter.

Click here to ENTER:Win Springsteen Book For You!

For You Bruce

Good Luck!
Bruce Springsteen 2013 Book Offer- Free Shipping

Exclusive Music-News.com Limited Time Offer!
Limited edition book, The Light in Darkness, less than 200 copies left.
Focusing on Darkness on The Edge of Town 1978 album and tour.
Free Shipping When You Order May 14 – May 31, 2013
CLICK HERE TO ORDER NOW- The Light in Darkness
*The Light in Darkness book is not sold in stores.
In support of the Montreal General Hospital's 2013 fundraising campaign, Lawrence Kirsch, publisher of “For You, Original Stories and Photographs by Bruce Springsteen’s Legendary Fans” and “The Light in Darkness,” is holding a raffle with a chance to win a brand new signed copy of “For You,” which has been sold out since December 2008.

GIVING
The generosity of donors, volunteers and auxiliaries has made the MUHC what it is today…these precious funds are used for the benefit of current and future patients at the MGH. We are collecting funds to benefit two MGH departments, the Emergency/Trauma, and the Colorectal Department.

To help raise funds we are raffling off a brand new signed copy (by the publisher) of For You: Original Stories and Photographs by Bruce Springsteen's Legendary Fans.

If you missed your chance to purchase a copy of this limited-edition book, or even if you just want a second copy to keep as a collector’s item, now is your opportunity. First edition copies of “For You” often sell for hundreds of dollars on eBay, when you can find a copy.

Each $10 ticket you purchase gives you one chance to win and a $15 ticket gives you three chances to win the book. The contest is open to everyone and tickets can be bought from March 21 - April 7, 2013. Tickets can be purchased at theLightinDarkness.com and Foryoubruce.com, where the winner will be announced April 11, 2013.

Participants can enter the contest as many times as they wish and all proceeds go to the Montreal General Hospital. The book, autographed by the publisher, will be shipped to the winner free of charge anywhere in the world, so everyone is encouraged to enter.

You can help the fund raising efforts for the 2013 campaign by participating in the raffle for a copy of For You. All monies collected will be donated to the Montreal General Hospital.

The Montreal General Hospital, founded in 1821, enjoys a distinguished world reputation, as well as an impressive history of community service. The Montreal General Hospital, a pioneer hospital in North America, introduced teaching at the bedside and founded the first medical school in Canada — the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University.

The hospital has remained allied as a teaching hospital for the century and a half of the Faculty’s existence. The Montreal General Hospital is dedicated to patient care through diagnosis, treatment, research and teaching.


"Through the years, I've read almost every book written about Springsteen. Some are great and many are not. Over time, I've even become cynical when I hear about new books. In the last few years, there have been a plethora of coffee table book releases in the Springsteen world. Each one in itself is a gorgeous work of art that will glisten on your polished coffee table. However, chances are you are still missing the ultimate Bruce Springsteen keepsake: For You. When I heard about this book a year ago, I dismissed it thinking I didn't really need yet another glorified coffee table book. I was wrong, dead wrong. For You takes the reader on a magical, mystical and poignant journey through forty years of Bruce Springsteen's life. It's a time machine to the past where tickets were once $7, the E Street Band was a boy's only club, Steve Van Zandt looked like a member of Jimmy Buffet's band and most of the members of the E Street Band could have begun their own television show - 'Stashin.' I wasn't impressed with the book, I was bowled over.

Anthony Kuzminski
antimusic.com


"In reading For You, at first it's hard to believe that one performer could possibly have touched this many people this deeply - lifted them from depression, kept them from suicide, helped them through divorce or the death of a parent, or worse, a child. But story after story reveals just how much Springsteen's music and his almost superhuman presence on the concert stage have penetrated people's lives and, in as much as it is possible for music to do so, made them whole.

In fact, there's a running theme of these reminiscences, one that is sure to warm any Bruce fan's heart: that you are not crazy. Not crazy for seeing dozens or even hundreds of concerts; not crazy for feeling that Springsteen's songs and lyrics have actually helped carry you through some of life's toughest moments; not crazy to think that this man whom you've never met has and continues to fill some kind of void in your life."

Peter Chianca
Excerpt from Blogness on the Edge of Town

Please help spread the news on your Facebook page and Twitter.

Tickets can be purchased at theLightinDarkness.com and Foryoubruce.com, where the winner will be announced April 11, 2013.

I was 16 in 1973 when Bruce Springsteen’s Greetings From Asbury Park, NJ album came out on January 5th. 16 at a time when rock music ruled the school yard, and rock radio dominated the airwaves. At least in my little part of the world anyway.

My little world was suburban Trenton, NJ (capital city & Garden Spot of the Garden State), in lovely Hamilton. David Bowie’s Ziggy…album was our musical highlight of the previous year. My favorites were always Bob Dylan and Van Morrison and the Four Tops and Marvin Gaye and the Supremes and too numerous to mention insane Philly Soul sides as spun by the great Jerry Blavet. We also loved what Lou Reed was doing (even more so fueled by Bowie), Neil Young, and the Allmans Eat A Peach. I loved The Band and Joni and Stevie and Curtis Mayfield’s amazing Superfly and some new guy named Jackson Browne. Yes was a big deal and we greeted Mott The Hoople (hello again, Mr. Bowie) with open ears and arms. The Rolling Stones, Elton John and Rod Stewart always were a part of the landscape. The Beatles and their now various new incarnations always demanded attention.

I was 16 at a time when music was something more than a stolen computer file. I was 16 at a time when music mattered. You could debate the merits of any particular record with any of your friends for hours on end (with no resolution, of course) flip on the radio, hear something new and have the process begin again.

And needless to say, the radio was on constantly. My station of choice at the time was WMMR out of Philadelphia. Legend has it that that station’s then Program Director, Jerry Stevens, was tight with the folks who ran the old Main Point in Bryn Mawr and he put Greetings… into the new releases category to help expose this new artist from across the river to help out his Main Point pals who’d booked Bruce and the band to open for Travis Shook. The station’s DJs embraced Bruce and the album, and played it like crazy. The rest, as they say…

I was blown away. I can’t tell you which song I heard first, but I can tell you that the first song that blew my mind was “Spirit In The Night.” I was in with both feet and that was that. I loved the lyrical sophistication of “Blinded By The Light” (hey, I was 16). I loved everything about “Spirit In The Night.” I was afraid of “Mary Queen Of Arkansas” (hey, I was 16). And then there’s “Growin’ Up,” which was something that I was furiously trying to do at the time. I have, in fact, spent the past 40 years trying to find the answer to every impossible question/situation in the engine of some old parked car. My quest continues… To find out that the guy making this amazing music was from Jersey, and actually embraced it was almost too much to handle. Almost too good to be true. I bought the album and listened to it over and over. Savoring each little songwriting gem, and always the mind boggling sax parts on “Spirit In The Night,” the album spoke to me like nothing else had ever before.

So Greetings From Asbury Park, NJ turns 40. And as I listen to my 40 year old copy of said album on my stylish, retro record player, I do so with wonder. That album kept me in good stead when I left home for college the following year. It’s been with me in Ohio and California and felt especially comfortable at the Jersey Shore. My sister lives in the house that we grew up in, and I’ll often take a minute to look in on my old room. How blessed I am that so many of the dreams and schemes that were hatched in that room have come true.

Sunday, January 6 on the Bruce Brunch on 105.7 The Hawk, Bruce Springtseen’s first album will be touted and celebrated. I’ll play the entire album throughout the course of the show. And hit the vault for some cool early ’73 live songs. Garry Tallent will be calling in and Vini Lopez will be visiting in the studio. They both played on the album and it’ll be great to hear them reminisce.

40 years later, I thank Bruce Springsteen for standing up when they told him to sit down. 40 years burning down the road and the story continues. Here’s to a magical 2013.

Tom Cunningham
1057theHawk.com

Discover the limited edition Bruce Springsteen book, The Light in Darkness.
The Light In Darkness is a collector’s edition, we are almost sold out. Less than 200 copies remain.
A great companion piece to The Promise box set, it focuses on the 1978 Darkness on The Edge of Town album and tour.
Read about the iconic concerts from fans who were there – the Agora, Winterland, Roxy, MSG, Capitol Theatre, Boston Music Hall, The Spectrum and over seventy more!
Click Here to Order Now and Save on Shipping:
The Light in Darkness

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